Disclaimer

This blog is not intended to provide legal advice, legal services or legal anything else. Don't sue me. All I have is debt anyway.

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

But I like my stripper shoes...

Above the Law had this article reporting on a recent panel discussing professional attire. Definitely, for interviews and jury trials, conservative and well-groomed is the way to go. But when it comes to the rest of the time, I don't think conservative, boring and stuffy is necessary.

Considering that I've seen attorneys come to motion hour in jeans, in sweater vests, in stretch pants, in sundresses, in flipflops, in sneakers, in some of the ugliest ties ever made, in some of the ugliest colored suits ever imagined, and one chick who's a public defender has purple highlights in her dark blond hair... I think I'll keep wearing my 5 inch stilettos and dark nail polish. And I'm not wearing panty hose in the summer, because no one else does. Not even this chick who's a partner at a Big City firm we have a case with. Maybe she does there, but she doesn't here. Heck, one of the judges wears jeans and sneakers under his robe, and he has long hair. So, yeah, not really stuffy and conservative around here.

The City was a little different, but not much. I've seen some of the women wear dark colored tennis shoes to court, and as far as crazy outfits go, there are far more there. But then, I guess anything you wear looks good when your client's showing up to court wearing tight sweat pants that say "Bootylicious" across the ass (again, if your ass can fit the word "Bootylicious" across it... it's not).

So, yes, I will wear these to court, because they're awesome.

2 comments:

Jeanne said...

Those shoes are FABULOUS!

legally certifiable said...

I'm right there with ya, girl. I'll stick to conservative suits, but I refuse to give up my stiletto heels. I have 2 pair of red heels, both of which I wear to work!

Besides, my heels get me closer to eye level with all the guys I have to deal with, and make me tall enough to see over the bench at hearings.